A B O U T

sample vials with various bacteria

WHO WE ARE

WHAT WE DO

WHY IT MATTERS

F Cubed®, LLC, (F Cubed®; F3) was founded on the objective to create a molecular diagnostic method which could take a raw sample to a full assay in less than one hour in any location.

 

Based in South Bend, Indiana, home of the University of Notre Dame, F3 benefits from a diverse workforce of specialists with expertise in life sciences, engineering, and entrepreneurship. We have attracted talent from across the United States with graduates from institutions such as the University of Notre Dame, Princeton University, Purdue University, the University of Texas, University of Pennsylvania, University of Pittsburgh, and the University of California.

 

Our rapid detection system, based on AC Dielectrophoretic technology, was developed by Dr. Hseuh-Chia Chang, the Bayer Professor of Chemical Engineering at the University of Notre Dame. F Cubed continues to benefit from affiliation with the University.

 

The City of South Bend has shown their commitment to the creation of high technology businesses, in general, and to F3, in particular, through  the innovative leasing of production equipment for our proprietary biochips and related consumables. This includes specialized robotic and semi-automated production lines.

 

Individually and as a company, we aspire to change the world for the better by offering revolutionary diagnostic solutions.

F Cubed® makes molecular diagnostics easy in virtually any environment via the production of our rapid, DNA-based molecular diagnostic devices and accompanying test kits.

 

Currently, F3's proprietary technology can be used for environmental, food safety, medical diagnostics (at present, for research purposes only), and oil & gas applications.

 

F3 operates under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the US Environmental Protection Agency and has a research contract with Purdue University Food Safety Lab to conduct trials for pathogen testing on produce. F3 will soon begin clinical trials to obtain US Food & Drug Administration clearance to offer our products for commercial use in medical diagnostic applications.

 

F3 has obtained patent and patent pending licenses from the University of Notre Dame, as well as additional patents applied for and received based on our independent, ongoing research. Our growing intellectual property assets include registered trademarks for our F3 logo and our NESDEP®IU diagnostic unit.

 

F Cubed® continues to grow rapidly, as we find exciting new markets and innovative uses for our groundbreaking, proprietary technology.

biochip in hand

When it comes to waiting for diagnostic results, speed matters. Rapid diagnostics make crucial difference by saving time, money, scarce resources, and lives.

 

The NESDEP®IU is the fastest DNA-based molecular detector ever created. The ability to produce accurate test results in any location, without a full lab or special training, and 24x faster than the most expeditious versions of current testing trends is revolutionary. These innovative benefits carry immense weight, not only for state-of-the-art diagnostic services, but also for third-world and developing nations that do not have convenient access to full laboratories or fully-trained professionals.

 

Our cutting-edge biochip technology implicates monumental potential to continue accelerating operation speed and to further downsize equipment for maximum efficiency and portability.

 

Fast and accessible diagnostics leads to earlier treatment. Earlier treatment can change the world for the better.

OUR TEAM

MIKE CLOONAN

Director of Client Development

CONTACT

LES IVIE

President & CEO

CONTACT

SONJA JOHNSTON

Lead Production Technician

CONTACT

SHAUNASEE KOCEN

Director of Biology & Biosafety Officer

CONTACT

ANDREW MORRIS

Lead Assembly Technician

CONTACT

CHRIS QUINN

Associate Biologist

CONTACT

MOLLY SAYLES

Marketing & Sales Strategist

CONTACT

GABE SHAKOUR

Director of Technology

CONTACT

THOMAS WACK

Software Engineer

CONTACT

CLAIRE WACK

Associate Biologist

CONTACT

ALEX WANG

Chief Development Officer

CONTACT

BOB WILLIAMS

Vice President of Business Development

CONTACT

COMPANY ALUMNI

AWARDS

Frost & Sullivan Award Best of Tech Indiana Award Mira Awards Innovation Park Pacesetter Award

2014 North America Frost & Sullivan Award for Technology Innovation Leadership

Nominee for the 15th annual Mira Awards

2012 IPND (Innovation Park Notre Dame) Pacesetter Award

COMPANY NEWS

  • 04/11/2016 - F CUBED®LLC PREPARES TO MOVE TO NEW STUDEBAKER 113 FACILITY

    Studebaker renovations insidestudebaker renovations outside facadeSOUTH BEND - F Cubed®, LLC plans to make their move into the revamped Studebaker 113 building by the end of May. The renovation has been ongoing for over a year and progress is moving along well.

     

    Pictured left: ceiling painting, trench cover placement, exterior facade work.

     

    More information:

    http://www.southbendtribune.com/news/local/renovation-of-old-studebaker-plant-under-way-in-south-bend/article_e494617a-6017-54de-91bb-862e8f7c3fd4.html

     

    http://www.ibj.com/articles/55574-renovation-eyed-for-ex-studebaker-plant-in-south-bend

  • 02/22/2016 - BOB WILLIAMS FEATURED ON FOODQUALITYNEWS.COM

    Bob Williams featured on Foodqualitynews.comBob Williams was recently interviewed by FoodQualityNews.com regarding where F Cubed® is at with it's groundbreaking technology in the food safety industry. Check it out here.

  • 08/25/2015 - KOCEN TO BEGIN COLLABORATION WITH NOTRE DAME

    Notre Dame collaborationThe F Cubed team would like to extend a congratulations to Shaunasee Kocen. Along with her role as F Cubed Director of Biology, she will be starting her doctoral studies in the University of Notre Dame Bioengineering department with Dr. Hseuh-Chia Chang.

  • 02/09/2015 - CEOCFO MAGAZINE INTERVIEW WITH LES IVIE

    Les Ivie was recently interviewed by CEOCFO Magazine regarding F Cubed's® commercialization of rapid molecular detection technology.

     

    You can read the entire interview here:

    http://www.ceocfointerviews.com/interviews/FCubed15.htm

  • 11/17/2014 - US EPA TECHNOLOGY SHOWCASE DECEMBER 2, 2014

    united states environmental protection agency EPAThe US EPA has invited F Cubed®, LLC to attend and present its cutting-edge water testing technology at the Technology Innovation Showcase and Technology Transfer and Collaboration Seminar on Tuesday, December 2, 2014 at EPA's Research Facility in Cincinnati, Ohio.

     

    The EPA Technology Innovation Showcase will feature interactive displays and hands-on demonstrations of innovative technologies that are being developed by EPA researchers and private-sector companies in important environmental challenge areas.

     

    F Cubed®, LLC has a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the EPA focused on water testing.  Our central Midwest location in South Bend, IN puts us close to many of the recreational waterways significantly impacted by traditional testing technology that provides water contamination results in 24 hours or more.

  • 11/13/2014 - "INVESTING FOR CURES: 2020 FORESIGHT" NOVEMBER 29, 2014 NYC

    F Cubed®, LLC has been selected to present at an exclusive New York City conference focused on breakthroughs in medicine and medical diagnostics.

     

    "Investing for Cures: 2020 Foresight" will be held on November 19, 2014 in New York City.  Only 20 companies were invited to present their technology to an impressive group of major foundations, investors and medical companies.

    F Cubed will be presenting its NESDEP® IU rapid diagnostic technology and explaining the transformative impact it can have in the medical field.

     

    Les Ivie, F Cubed's CEO, will be presenting the Company's technology and answering questions from interested parties.

     

    For more information, please contact F Cubed®, LLC at info@fcubed.biz

  • 11/07/2014 - F CUBED®, LLC ANNOUNCES TECHNION DEVELOPMENT LICENSE

    Technion F Cubed®, LLC is pleased to announce a historic licensing agreement with Technion (The Israeli Institute of Technology).  The license is for the "Technion Discovery Platform" utilizing specific tools and for the development of molecular probes.

     

    This powerful agreement will result in the ability of F Cubed®, LLC, to develop and test new targets for our patented biochip kits in as little as five days.

     

    F Cubed®, LLC and Technion are pleased to partner in this groundbreaking capability to quickly address the growing need to accurately and quickly detect pathogens.

     

     For more information, contact info@fcubed.biz.

  • 10/09/2014 - F CUBED®, LLC RECEIVES 2014 NORTH AMERICA FROST & SULLIVAN AWARD FOR TECHNOLOGY INNOVATION LEADERSHIP

    Frost & Sullivan Applauds F Cubed® for its Game-Changing MRSA Screener, the NESDEP® IU

    As the technology measures the DNA and not the vector, it can be deployed to screen multiple pathogens

     

    MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. —August 5, 2014— Based on its recent analysis of the methillicin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) screening market, Frost & Sullivan recognizes F Cubed®, LLC. with the 2014 North America Frost & Sullivan Award for Technology Innovation Leadership. F Cubed’s portable device, the NESDEP® IU, can rapidly and cost-effectively screen patients suspected of having contracted MRSA. This screening tool can help eliminate unwanted side effects, time, anxiety, and the huge costs associated with the treatment of MRSA.

     

    The NESDEP® IU can be operated by laymen with minimal staff training The device operates on a biochip that measures 7 millimeters (mm) by 14 mm and comprises nano-scale electrodes and microfluidic structures that contain a mix of carbon nanotubes characterized to hybridize with very specific DNA molecules.

     

    Importantly, the NESDEP® IU and its associated screening test are 10 times less expensive than competing medical equipment in the market. The NESDEP® IU can screen a MRSA-suspect patient within two hours, thereby accelerating the delivery of an appropriate treatment.

     

    “The device is highly durable and portable, and comes in a durable MIL-SPEC plastic case with wheels. It weighs approximately 35 kg and can fit on a 3-foot table top,” said Frost & Sullivan Saju Mathew, Industry Analyst. “In the future, F Cubed plans to integrate several biochips into the system to enable the simultaneous detection of a wider range of pathogens.”

     

    Apart from being applied for the rapid identification of pathogenic bacteria in medical diagnostics, F Cubed uses the NESDEP IU in food safety and environmental science applications as well. It is also looking into pathogens such as E. coli, Listeria, and Salmonella due to the recent passage of the Food Safety Modernization Act in 2011. As the regulatory hurdles in the food safety industry are not as stringent as in the medical diagnostics industry, Frost & Sullivan expects strong traction for F Cubed®, LLC in this segment.

     

    “F Cubed's technology rests on exclusive licenses obtained from the University of Notre Dame (Notre Dame, Indiana) and the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology,” noted Saju Mathew. “Through careful, strategic patent planning, F Cubed has isolated critical features and pursued strategies that are most likely to protect the company’s value.”

     

    Furthermore, to ensure an efficient and healthy relationship with its customers, initially, F Cubed®, LLC will only serve those regions where service personnel are only a day’s drive away from the customer’s location. The low requirements for device functioning and maintenance are allowing F Cubed®, LLC to consider penetrating countries with inadequate resources, infrastructure, or trained medical staff.

     

    The company’s technology will truly go a long way in saving lives as well as ensuring safer food and water. For these important technological advances, Frost & Sullivan is proud to present the 2014 North America Frost & Sullivan Award for Technology Innovation Leadership to F Cubed®, LLC.

     

    Each year, Frost & Sullivan presents this award to the company that has demonstrated uniqueness in developing and leveraging new technologies, which significantly impacts both the functionality and the customer value of the new products and applications. The award lauds the high R&D spent toward innovation, its relevance to the industry and the positive impact on brand perception.

     

    Frost & Sullivan Best Practices Awards recognize companies in a variety of regional and global markets for demonstrating outstanding achievement and superior performance in areas such as leadership, technological innovation, customer service and strategic product development. Industry analysts compare market participants and measure performance through in-depth interviews, analysis and extensive secondary research to identify best practices in the industry.

     

     

    About F Cubed LLC

     

    F Cubed®, LLC was founded in 2010 in South Bend, Indiana to create a molecular diagnostic method taking a raw sample to a full assay in less than two hours. The company licensed the AC Dielectrophoretic technology from the University of Notre Dame. F Cubed is divided into three separate companies, Food Safety, Environmental and Medical. Tests have been developed to detect MRSA, lymphatic filariasis, E.coli, listeria and salmonella. Future tests include cryptosporidium, C.difficile, enterococcus, and campylobacter.

     

    Trials for water testing are set to begin with the City of South Bend Water Treatment Facility, food testing with Purdue University and FDA 510K trials with 4 U.S. hospitals.

     

     

    About Frost & Sullivan

     

    Frost & Sullivan, the Growth Partnership Company, works in collaboration with clients to leverage visionary innovation that addresses the global challenges and related growth opportunities that will make or break today's market participants.

     

    Our “Growth Partnership” supports clients by addressing these opportunities and incorporating two key elements driving visionary innovation: The Integrated Value Proposition and The Partnership Infrastructure.

     

    • The Integrated Value Proposition provides support to our clients throughout all phases of their journey to visionary innovation including: research, analysis, strategy, vision, innovation and implementation.
    • The Partnership Infrastructure is entirely unique as it constructs the foundation upon which visionary innovation becomes possible. This includes our 360 degree research, comprehensive industry coverage, career best practices as well as our global footprint of more than 40 offices.

     

    For more than 50 years, we have been developing growth strategies for the global 1000, emerging businesses, the public sector and the investment community. Is your organization prepared for the next profound wave of industry convergence, disruptive technologies, increasing competitive intensity, Mega Trends, breakthrough best practices, changing customer dynamics and emerging economies?.

  • 10/08/2014 - F CUBED®, LLC CEO testifies before Congress regarding nanotechnology

    Just when it seemed like debate over the National Nanotechnology Initiative was a thing of the past (see Foresight’s disappointment in 2008 here) disagreements regarding re-authorization and budget cuts are prompting politicians and researchers to take a detailed look at what the program supports and what it is achieving.

     

    Witnesses to the House Research Subcommittee hearing, held this past May, included Timothy Persons of US GAO, who spoke at Foresight’s 2014 Integration Conference (and whose work indicating shortfalls in US manufacturing and policy is highlighted in a recent Nanodot post here), and Lloyd Whitman of CNST who emphasized the great strides made in building collaborative facilities that support decentralization of technological advancement, also a key area of discussion at the Integration Conference.

     

     

    Some highlights from the hearing appear in the American Institute of Physics online bulletin:

     

    The Research Subcommittee of the House Science, Space and Technology Committee held a hearing on May 20 during which Members examined nanotechnology research and development and discussed the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI). Both parties noted that the House of Representatives had previously passed a reauthorization of this Initiative but that the Senate did not. There was bi-partisan interest from Members of the subcommittee to again attempt to reauthorize NNI.

     

    Subcommittee Chairman Larry Bucshon (R-IN) opened the hearing by describing the development of nanomaterials and listing many products developed due to nanotechnology. “In 2013, the National Science Foundation (NSF) nanotechnology investment supported 5,000 active projects, over 30 research centers and several infrastructure networks for device development, computation, and education,” noted Bucshon as he highlighted the 150 small businesses that were funded through the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and the Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Programs. Bucshon was displeased at the President’s budget request for NSF directorates that support nanotechnology research, noting the $1.5 million decrease in the FY 2015 budget for those directorates.

     

    Ranking Member Dan Lipinski (D-IL) also noted the federal investments in nanotechnology and was interested in including recommendations from the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology into the discussions about reauthorization of NNI. Committee Ranking Member Eddie Bernice Johnson (D-TX) described a 2014 Government Accountability Office report that described challenges that the U.S. nanotechnology sector faces from international competition. She advocated for strong sustained investments in nanotechnology and for the reauthorization of NNI.

     

    Five witnesses testified. Timothy Persons, Chief Scientist of the Government Accountability Office (GAO) spoke about the transfer of nanotechnology out of the laboratory into industry and how the U.S. compares internationally. He emphasized the role of public-private partnerships but cautioned that the U.S. is lagging behind other nations in public support for nanotechnology as well as quantity of publications.

     

    Lloyd Whitman, Interim Director of the National Nanotechnology Council and Deputy Director of the Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology at the National Institutes of Standards and Technology described the collaboration between the 20 federal agencies that consist of the NNI. He noted the “major innovation enterprise” as he discussed the national strategy for nanotechnology research and development.

     

    Keith Stevenson, Professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of Texas at Austin discussed the state of nanotechnology research and the possibilities for scaling such research. He also noted the impact of programs at UT Austin which train freshman undergraduate students in nanotechnology.

     

    Mark Hersam, Professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering in the School of Engineering and Applied Science at Northwestern University described the startup companies that formed out of Northwestern University. He emphasized the need for efficiency in patent processing at the U.S. Patent and Trademark office as he drew a parallel between nanotechnology and increased national economic growth.

     

    Les Ivie, President and CEO of F Cubed described programs at two year institutions focused on training students to work in nanotechnology. There is a need for two year programs in many states and he advocated for community colleges to adopt such programs. He provided the subcommittee with a description of his work in private industry while also emphasizing the importance of NSF funding support for nanotechnology research.

     

    Following the testimony, Bucshon asked Whitman to comment on how the U.S. can remain competitive in nanotechnology with flat or decreased funding levels. Whitman noted that nanotechnology tends to receive competitive funding levels relative to other sciences. Bucshon also inquired about the national approach for supporting nanotechnology research, specifically how the government should ensure environmental health and safety. He was particularly interested in hearing more about the targeted nature of cancer treatment provided by nanotechnology.

     

    Lipinski asked witnesses to offer recommendations for a potential reauthorization of NNI. Whitman responded that the review and reporting requirements could be more efficient and that the schedule of the regulatory reviews could be more streamlined. Hersam emphasized the need to broadly fund nanotechnology research, not just that research which currently shows the most promise in order to avoid “picking winners.” Persons discussed the need for environmental health and safety as well as international standards. Lipinski also asked about technology transfer for SBIR programs to which Hersam discussed appropriate levels of funding for each of the stages of that program.

     

    Rep. Chris Collins (R-NY) asked witnesses to comment on funding cuts for university programs, such as that of Cornell University. Whitman answered that the NSF solicited advice on how to proceed with a program through a “Dear Colleague” letter. Members from both parties recognized that funding cannot be “cut off then turned back on” for nanotechnology research to thrive.

     

    Ranking Member Johnson asked about how the NNI provided support for K-12 science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education programs in addition to supporting workforce development programs. Whitman described some of the programs of the agencies involved with NNI and Ivie noted the need for workers with technical associate degrees. Ivie mentioned the success of the NSF career network in promoting STEM jobs.

     

     

    Aline D. McNaull

    Government Relations Division

    American Institute of Physics

  • 03/11/2014 - F CUBED®, LLC NOMINATED FOR 2014 TECHPOINT MIRA AWARDS: THE BEST OF TECH IN INDIANA

    TechPoint, Indiana's technoloy growth initiative, announced F Cubed®, LLC as a nominee for the 15th annual Mira Awards presented by BKD CPAs & Advisors.

  • 06/06/2012 - PORTABLE, RAPID MRSA TEST THAT TAKES LESS THAN AN HOUR READY FOR FDA SUBMISSION

    MedCity Media

    By: Deanna Pogorelc

     

    F Cubed®, LLC hopes its device will help hospital physicians quickly diagnose pathogens, eventually including pseudomonas and bacterial meningitis, from a small fluid sample.

     

    Its device, called Nesdep, contains disposable biochips that are loaded with DNA from a 10- to 100 microliter-sized sample of blood or wound product. Using carbon nanotubes and AC dielectrophoresis, the biochip traps and quantifies target DNA in the sample in a matter of minutes, said CEO Les Ivie.

     

    The hardware of the device comprises two components: a mechanism that extracts and isolates DNA from the fluid sample, and a second mechanism that moves that DNA through the biochip and connects to an iPad or computer to deliver results.

    Nesdep® IU is already available for use in water and food safety testing, and Ivie said his team is meeting with the FDA this month to begin its application process. Initially the biochip will be able to detect only MRSA, but the company expects to release a multi-target biochip by mid-2013, Ivie said. It’s working with an emergency room physician at South Bend’s Memorial Hospital on trials of the device.

     

    About 90,000 Americans are sickened by MRSA each year. Hospital-acquired infections have been a hotbed for innovation as an increasing number of cases have demonstrated resistance to traditional antibiotics. Rapid detection devices already on the market include BD Diagnostics’ BD GeneOhm StaphSR, which was cleared in 2008, and Cepheid’s Xpert MRSA.

     

    Nesdep® IU’s value proposition, according to the company, is that it’s portable enough to run on power from a vehicle’s cigarette lighter, works in as little as 30 minutes without the use of reagents, and costs 10 to 20 percent of what laboratory-based tests cost.

     

    F3 licensed its technology from the University of Notre Dame and is located at Innovation Park in South Bend, Indiana.

  • F CUBED ALUMNI

    Matthew Bowers

    Role: Business Development Researcher

    Education: University of Notre Dame Postdoctoral Researcher (Nuclear Physics)

     

    Christopher Chanelli

    Role: Technology Manager

    Education: University of Notre Dame BS Chemical Engineering

     

    Andrew Chipouras

    Role: Engineering Intern

    Education: University of Notre Dame BS Chemical Engineering

     

    Sienna Combs

    Role: Marketing Intern

    Education: University of Notre Dame Student (Business)

     

    Michael Dineen

    Role: Lymphatic Filariasis Researcher

    Education: University of Notre Dame MS Global Health

     

    Lauren Firanek

    Role: Biology Intern

    Education: University of Notre Dame Science Pre-professional Studies

     

    Andrew E. Foley

    Role: Business Development Researcher

    Education: University of Notre Dame BA Pre-Health Studies and MS in Business candidate

     

    Brendan Heinz

    Role: Engineering Intern

    Education: University of Notre Dame Student

     

    Daniel Kocen

    Role: Vice President of Operations

    Education: UC Irvine BS Biomedical Engineering

     

    Annie Kotz

    Role: Marketing Researcher

    Education: University of Notre Dame MS ESTEEM

     

    Stanley (Shih-Dun) Liu

    Role: Study Coordinator

    Education: University of Notre Dame MS ESTEEM

     

    Abel Manumbu

    Role: Business Development and Technology Researcher

    Education: University of Notre Dame MS ESTEEM

     

    Mao Mao

    Role: Engineering Intern

    Education: Northwestern University Ph.D. Candidate; Mechanical Engineering

     

    Matt Mochel

    Role: Production Technician

    Education: Ivy Tech Nanotechnology Program

     

    Christine Ruffing

    Role: Biology Intern

    Education: University of Notre Dame BS Chemical Engineering

     

    David Schipper

    Role: Associate Biologist

    Education: University of Notre Dame BS Biology

     

    Michael Shockley

    Role: Biology Intern

    Education: University of Notre Dame Student (Science/Business)

     

    Charles Sefuku

    Role: Engineering Technologist

    Education: Purdue University BS Electrical and Computer Engineering

     

    John Szajko

    Role: Manufacturing Research Assistant

    Education: Ivy Tech Nanotechnology Program

     

    Josh Tadevich

    Role: Life Sciences Intern

    Education: University of Notre Dame (Science)

     

    Johnathan Vidovich

    Role: Research Intern

    Education: University of Notre Dame Student (Biology/Economics)

     

    Eric Walker

    Role: Clinical Trial and Engineering Manager, Sales and Marketing Manager

    Education: University of Pittsburgh (Chemical Engineering)

     

sample vials with various bacteria
Innovation Park Pacesetter Award
  • Studebaker renovations insidestudebaker renovations outside facade

  • Bob Williams featured on Foodqualitynews.com

  • Notre Dame collaborationThe F Cubed team would like to extend a congratulations to Shaunasee Kocen. Along with her role as F Cubed Director of Biology, she will be starting her doctoral studies in the University of Notre Dame Bioengineering department with Dr. Hseuh-Chia Chang.

  • Les Ivie was recently interviewed by CEOCFO Magazine regarding F Cubed's® commercialization of rapid molecular detection technology.

     

    You can read the entire interview here:

    http://www.ceocfointerviews.com/interviews/FCubed15.htm

  • united states environmental protection agency EPAThe US EPA has invited F Cubed®, LLC to attend and present its cutting-edge water testing technology at the Technology Innovation Showcase and Technology Transfer and Collaboration Seminar on Tuesday, December 2, 2014 at EPA's Research Facility in Cincinnati, Ohio.

     

    The EPA Technology Innovation Showcase will feature interactive displays and hands-on demonstrations of innovative technologies that are being developed by EPA researchers and private-sector companies in important environmental challenge areas.

     

    F Cubed®, LLC has a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the EPA focused on water testing.  Our central Midwest location in South Bend, IN puts us close to many of the recreational waterways significantly impacted by traditional testing technology that provides water contamination results in 24 hours or more.

  • F Cubed®, LLC has been selected to present at an exclusive New York City conference focused on breakthroughs in medicine and medical diagnostics.

     

    "Investing for Cures: 2020 Foresight" will be held on November 19, 2014 in New York City.  Only 20 companies were invited to present their technology to an impressive group of major foundations, investors and medical companies.

    F Cubed will be presenting its NESDEP® IU rapid diagnostic technology and explaining the transformative impact it can have in the medical field.

     

    Les Ivie, F Cubed's CEO, will be presenting the Company's technology and answering questions from interested parties.

     

    For more information, please contact F Cubed®, LLC at info@fcubed.biz

  • Technion F Cubed®, LLC is pleased to announce a historic licensing agreement with Technion (The Israeli Institute of Technology).  The license is for the "Technion Discovery Platform" utilizing specific tools and for the development of molecular probes.

     

    This powerful agreement will result in the ability of F Cubed®, LLC, to develop and test new targets for our patented biochip kits in as little as five days.

     

    F Cubed®, LLC and Technion are pleased to partner in this groundbreaking capability to quickly address the growing need to accurately and quickly detect pathogens.

     

     For more information, contact info@fcubed.biz.

  • Just when it seemed like debate over the National Nanotechnology Initiative was a thing of the past (see Foresight’s disappointment in 2008 here) disagreements regarding re-authorization and budget cuts are prompting politicians and researchers to take a detailed look at what the program supports and what it is achieving.

     

    Witnesses to the House Research Subcommittee hearing, held this past May, included Timothy Persons of US GAO, who spoke at Foresight’s 2014 Integration Conference (and whose work indicating shortfalls in US manufacturing and policy is highlighted in a recent Nanodot post here), and Lloyd Whitman of CNST who emphasized the great strides made in building collaborative facilities that support decentralization of technological advancement, also a key area of discussion at the Integration Conference.

     

     

    Some highlights from the hearing appear in the American Institute of Physics online bulletin:

     

    The Research Subcommittee of the House Science, Space and Technology Committee held a hearing on May 20 during which Members examined nanotechnology research and development and discussed the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI). Both parties noted that the House of Representatives had previously passed a reauthorization of this Initiative but that the Senate did not. There was bi-partisan interest from Members of the subcommittee to again attempt to reauthorize NNI.

     

    Subcommittee Chairman Larry Bucshon (R-IN) opened the hearing by describing the development of nanomaterials and listing many products developed due to nanotechnology. “In 2013, the National Science Foundation (NSF) nanotechnology investment supported 5,000 active projects, over 30 research centers and several infrastructure networks for device development, computation, and education,” noted Bucshon as he highlighted the 150 small businesses that were funded through the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and the Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Programs. Bucshon was displeased at the President’s budget request for NSF directorates that support nanotechnology research, noting the $1.5 million decrease in the FY 2015 budget for those directorates.

     

    Ranking Member Dan Lipinski (D-IL) also noted the federal investments in nanotechnology and was interested in including recommendations from the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology into the discussions about reauthorization of NNI. Committee Ranking Member Eddie Bernice Johnson (D-TX) described a 2014 Government Accountability Office report that described challenges that the U.S. nanotechnology sector faces from international competition. She advocated for strong sustained investments in nanotechnology and for the reauthorization of NNI.

     

    Five witnesses testified. Timothy Persons, Chief Scientist of the Government Accountability Office (GAO) spoke about the transfer of nanotechnology out of the laboratory into industry and how the U.S. compares internationally. He emphasized the role of public-private partnerships but cautioned that the U.S. is lagging behind other nations in public support for nanotechnology as well as quantity of publications.

     

    Lloyd Whitman, Interim Director of the National Nanotechnology Council and Deputy Director of the Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology at the National Institutes of Standards and Technology described the collaboration between the 20 federal agencies that consist of the NNI. He noted the “major innovation enterprise” as he discussed the national strategy for nanotechnology research and development.

     

    Keith Stevenson, Professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of Texas at Austin discussed the state of nanotechnology research and the possibilities for scaling such research. He also noted the impact of programs at UT Austin which train freshman undergraduate students in nanotechnology.

     

    Mark Hersam, Professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering in the School of Engineering and Applied Science at Northwestern University described the startup companies that formed out of Northwestern University. He emphasized the need for efficiency in patent processing at the U.S. Patent and Trademark office as he drew a parallel between nanotechnology and increased national economic growth.

     

    Les Ivie, President and CEO of F Cubed described programs at two year institutions focused on training students to work in nanotechnology. There is a need for two year programs in many states and he advocated for community colleges to adopt such programs. He provided the subcommittee with a description of his work in private industry while also emphasizing the importance of NSF funding support for nanotechnology research.

     

    Following the testimony, Bucshon asked Whitman to comment on how the U.S. can remain competitive in nanotechnology with flat or decreased funding levels. Whitman noted that nanotechnology tends to receive competitive funding levels relative to other sciences. Bucshon also inquired about the national approach for supporting nanotechnology research, specifically how the government should ensure environmental health and safety. He was particularly interested in hearing more about the targeted nature of cancer treatment provided by nanotechnology.

     

    Lipinski asked witnesses to offer recommendations for a potential reauthorization of NNI. Whitman responded that the review and reporting requirements could be more efficient and that the schedule of the regulatory reviews could be more streamlined. Hersam emphasized the need to broadly fund nanotechnology research, not just that research which currently shows the most promise in order to avoid “picking winners.” Persons discussed the need for environmental health and safety as well as international standards. Lipinski also asked about technology transfer for SBIR programs to which Hersam discussed appropriate levels of funding for each of the stages of that program.

     

    Rep. Chris Collins (R-NY) asked witnesses to comment on funding cuts for university programs, such as that of Cornell University. Whitman answered that the NSF solicited advice on how to proceed with a program through a “Dear Colleague” letter. Members from both parties recognized that funding cannot be “cut off then turned back on” for nanotechnology research to thrive.

     

    Ranking Member Johnson asked about how the NNI provided support for K-12 science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education programs in addition to supporting workforce development programs. Whitman described some of the programs of the agencies involved with NNI and Ivie noted the need for workers with technical associate degrees. Ivie mentioned the success of the NSF career network in promoting STEM jobs.

     

     

    Aline D. McNaull

    Government Relations Division

    American Institute of Physics

  • TechPoint, Indiana's technoloy growth initiative, announced F Cubed®, LLC as a nominee for the 15th annual Mira Awards presented by BKD CPAs & Advisors.

  • MedCity Media

  • WHAT WE DO

    F Cubed® makes molecular diagnostics easy in virtually any environment via the production of our rapid, DNA-based molecular diagnostic devices and accompanying test kits.

     

    Currently, F3's proprietary technology can be used for environmental, food safety, medical diagnostics (at present, for research purposes only), and oil & gas applications.

     

    F3 operates under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the US Environmental Protection Agency and has a research contract with Purdue University Food Safety Lab to conduct trials for pathogen testing on produce. F3 will soon begin clinical trials to obtain US Food & Drug Administration clearance to offer our products for commercial use in medical diagnostic applications.

     

    F3 has obtained patent and patent pending licenses from the University of Notre Dame, as well as additional patents applied for and received based on our independent, ongoing research. Our growing intellectual property assets include registered trademarks for our F3 logo and our NESDEP®IU diagnostic unit.

     

    F Cubed® continues to grow rapidly, as we find exciting new markets and innovative uses for our groundbreaking, proprietary technology.

  • WHO WE ARE

    F Cubed®, LLC, (F Cubed®; F3) was founded on the objective to create a molecular diagnostic method which could take a raw sample to a full assay in less than one hour in any location.

     

    Based in South Bend, Indiana, home of the University of Notre Dame, F3 benefits from a diverse workforce of specialists with expertise in life sciences, engineering, and entrepreneurship. We have attracted talent from across the United States with graduates from institutions such as the University of Notre Dame, Princeton University, Purdue University, the University of Texas, University of Pennsylvania, University of Pittsburgh, and the University of California.

     

    Our rapid detection system, based on AC Dielectrophoretic technology, was developed by Dr. Hseuh-Chia Chang, the Bayer Professor of Chemical Engineering at the University of Notre Dame. F Cubed continues to benefit from affiliation with the University.

     

    The City of South Bend has shown their commitment to the creation of high technology businesses, in general, and to F3, in particular, through  the innovative leasing of production equipment for our proprietary biochips and related consumables. This includes specialized robotic and semi-automated production lines.

     

    Individually and as a company, we aspire to change the world for the better by offering revolutionary diagnostic solutions.

  • WHY IT MATTERS

    When it comes to waiting for diagnostic results, speed matters. Rapid diagnostics make crucial difference by saving time, money, scarce resources, and lives.

     

    The NESDEP®IU is the fastest DNA-based molecular detector ever created. The ability to produce accurate test results in any location, without a full lab or special training, and 24x faster than the most expeditious versions of current testing trends is revolutionary. These innovative benefits carry immense weight, not only for state-of-the-art diagnostic services, but also for third-world and developing nations that do not have convenient access to full laboratories or fully-trained professionals.

     

    Our cutting-edge biochip technology implicates monumental potential to continue accelerating operation speed and to further downsize equipment for maximum efficiency and portability.

     

    Fast and accessible diagnostics leads to earlier treatment. Earlier treatment can change the world for the better.

sample vials with various bacteria
biochip in hand
Innovation Park Pacesetter Award
  • Studebaker renovations insidestudebaker renovations outside facade

  • Bob Williams featured on Foodqualitynews.com

sample vials with various bacteria
biochip in hand
  • Studebaker renovations insidestudebaker renovations outside facade

  • Bob Williams featured on Foodqualitynews.com

  • Notre Dame collaboration

  • united states environmental protection agency EPA

  • Technion

biochip in hand
sample vials with various bacteria
  • Studebaker renovations insidestudebaker renovations outside facade

  • Bob Williams featured on Foodqualitynews.com

© 2016 F Cubed®, LLC